The Public Domain Review

This is just an automatic copy of Public Domain Review blog.

Master of Disaster, Ignatius Donnelly

Wednesday 27 September 2017 at 13:12

The destruction of Atlantis, cataclysmic comets, and a Manhattan tower made entirely from concrete and corpse — Carl Abbott on the life and work of a Minnesotan writer, and failed politician, with a mind primed for catastrophe. The magnificent civilization of Atlantis shattered and plunged beneath the sea in February 1882. Or, to be more […]

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2017/09/27/ignatius-donnelly-recipes-for-disaster/


The First Shape Book: Little Red Riding Hood (1863)

Wednesday 20 September 2017 at 17:17

This 1863 rendering of Perrault's classic tale, is thought to be the very first shape book, or die cut book, at least in the United States.

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/collections/little-red-riding-hood-1863/


On the Disposition of Iron in Variegated Strata (1868)

Tuesday 19 September 2017 at 14:48

Images depicting ferruginous variation from a 19th-century geological paper, at times like some kind of geological precursor to the 50s experiments of Abstract Expressionism.

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/collections/on-the-disposition-of-iron-in-variegated-strata-1868/


Park Conscious (1938)

Thursday 14 September 2017 at 18:02

Short film from the US Department of the Interior emphasising the physical and mental well-being that parks can bring.

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/collections/park-conscious-1938/


Human Forms in Nature: Ernst Haeckel’s Trip to South Asia and Its Aftermath

Wednesday 13 September 2017 at 17:26

An early promoter and populariser of Darwin's evolutionary theory, the German biologist and artist Ernst Haeckel was a hugely influential figure of the late 19th century. Bernd Brunner looks at how a trip to Sri Lanka sowed the seeds for not only Haeckel's majestic illustrations from his Art Forms in Nature, for which he is perhaps best known today, but also his disturbing ideas on race and eugenics.

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2017/09/13/human-forms-in-nature-ernst-haeckels-trip-to-south-asia-and-its-aftermath/


Human Forms in Nature: Ernst Haeckel’s Trip to South Asia and Its Aftermath

Wednesday 13 September 2017 at 12:57

An early promoter and populariser of Darwin’s evolutionary theory, the German biologist and artist Ernst Haeckel was a hugely influential figure of the late 19th century. Bernd Brunner looks at how a trip to Sri Lanka sowed the seeds for not only Haeckel’s majestic illustrations from his Art Forms in Nature, for which he is […]

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2017/09/13/human-forms-in-nature-ernst-haeckels-trip-to-south-asia-and-its-aftermath/


Émile-Antoine Bayard’s Illustrations for Around the Moon by Jules Verne (1870)

Tuesday 12 September 2017 at 16:21

Arguably the very first images to depict space travel on a scientific basis, these wonderful illustrations are the work of the French illustrator Émile-Antoine Bayard.

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/collections/bayard-and-de-neuvilles-illustrations-for-around-the-moon-by-jules-verne-1870/


Woodrow Wilson On Democratic Principles (1912)

Thursday 7 September 2017 at 18:23

Recording made by Woodrow Wilson in the run up to the 1912 election, which he would go on to win.

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/collections/woodrow-wilson-on-democratic-principles-1912/


Hieroglyphic Journal of a Voyage to the Caribbean (1815)

Wednesday 6 September 2017 at 17:31

Unusual and delightfully ingenious book which employs a series of "hieroglyphic" plates to frame an account of a trade voyage to the Caribbean.

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/collections/hieroglyphic-journal-of-a-voyage-to-the-caribbean-1815/


The Art of Philosophy: Visualising Aristotle in Early 17th-Century Paris

Wednesday 30 August 2017 at 18:37

With their elaborate interplay of image and text, the several large-scale prints designed by the French friar Martin Meurisse to communicate Aristotelian thought are wonderfully impressive creations. Susanna Berger explores the function of these complex works, and how such visual commentaries not only served to express philosophical ideas in a novel way but also engendered their own unique mode of thinking.

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2017/08/30/the-art-of-philosophy-visualising-aristotle-in-early-17th-century-paris/