The Public Domain Review

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Auto Polo (ca.1911)

Thursday 3 October 2013 at 18:14

Four photographs depicting dramatic scenes from an "auto polo" match, a version of polo played using cars rather than horses. The sport - thought to have been invented as a publicity stunt by a Ford automobile dealer from Topeka to sell Model Ts - was popular at fairs, exhibitions and sports venues across the United States and several areas in Europe from 1911 until the late 1920s.

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/10/03/auto-polo-ca-1911/


A Dangerous Man in the Pantheon

Wednesday 2 October 2013 at 16:24

This October marks 300 years since the birth of French Enlightenment thinker Denis Diderot. Although perhaps best known for co-founding the Encylopédie, Philipp Blom argues for the importance of Diderot's philosophical writings and how they offer a pertinent alternative to the Enlightenment cult of reason spearheaded by his better remembered contemporaries Voltaire and Rousseau.

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/10/02/a-dangerous-man-in-the-pantheon/


The World According to Pitt

Tuesday 1 October 2013 at 16:10

Jo Pugh, researcher at the UK National Archives, explores the newly digitised letters of former British Prime Minister William Pitt the Younger and his sister Hester, and how their contents shed an intimate light on one of the most politically influential families in British history.

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/10/01/the-world-according-to-pitt/


Animated GIFs: Émile Cohl’s Fantasmagorie (1908)

Thursday 26 September 2013 at 17:03

A series of animated GIFs excerpted by Okkult Motion Pictures from the French caricaturist, cartoonist and animator Émile Cohl’s Fantasmagorie. Made in 1908, this hand-drawn animation is considered by many film historians to be the very first animated cartoon. Despite appearances it is not created on a blackboard but rather on paper, the blackboard effect achieved by shooting each of the 700 drawings onto negative film. The title is a reference to the “fantasmograph”, a mid-19th century variant of the magic lantern that projected ghostly images on to surrounding walls. You can see the full film featured in our Films collection here. See more creations from Okkult Motion Pictures here in our Animated GIFs Collection. Okkult Motion Pictures is the brainchild of Marco Calabrese and Alessandro Scali from Turin, Italy. With the Excerpts project, Okkult Motion Pictures aims to bring to light the most interesting and unusual out-of-copyright moving images occulted in Internet archives, through a series of animated gifs. A digital archivalism project for the diffusion of open knowledge. Okkult Motion Pictures official website: / Facebook / Twitter All Okkult animated GIFs published here under a CC-BY-SA license. HELP TO KEEP US AFLOAT The Public Domain Review is a […]

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/09/26/animated-gifs-emile-cohls-fantasmagorie-1908/


Émile Cohl’s Fantasmagorie (1908)

Thursday 26 September 2013 at 17:02

An animated film by French caricaturist, cartoonist and animator Émile Cohl. It is one of the earliest examples of hand-drawn animation, and considered by many film historians to be the very first animated cartoon.

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/09/26/emile-cohls-fantasmagorie-1908/


Come Take a Trip in my Airship (1904)

Wednesday 25 September 2013 at 17:01

Rendition by Welsh-born baritone singer J. W. Myers of a song written and composed in 1904 by fellow countryman George "Honey Boy" Evans. The song would go on to be recorded, with slight variations, by a string of popular musicians including Jonny Cash and more recently Natalie Merchant.

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/09/25/come-take-a-trip-on-my-airship-1904/


Animated GIFs: Fleischer’s Bubbles (1922)

Tuesday 24 September 2013 at 17:02

A series of animated GIFs excerpted by Okkult Motion Pictures from Max Fleischer’s Bubbles, part of his Out of the Inkwell series, which also includes The Tantalizing Fly. You can see the full film featured on the Internet Archive. See more creations from Okkult Motion Pictures here in our Animated GIFs Collection. Okkult Motion Pictures is the brainchild of Marco Calabrese and Alessandro Scali from Turin, Italy. With the Excerpts project, Okkult Motion Pictures aims to bring to light the most interesting and unusual out-of-copyright moving images occulted in Internet archives, through a series of animated gifs. A digital archivalism project for the diffusion of open knowledge. Okkult Motion Pictures official website: / Facebook / Twitter All Okkult animated GIFs published here under a CC-BY-SA license. HELP TO KEEP US AFLOAT The Public Domain Review is a not-for-profit project and we rely on support from our readers to stay afloat. If you like what we do then please do consider making a donation. We welcome all contributions, big or small - everything helps! Become a Patron Small angel : £3.00 GBP - monthly Medium sized hero : £5.00 GBP - monthly Large emperor : £10.00 GBP - monthly Vast deity […]

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/09/24/animated-gifs-fleischers-bubbles-1922/


Ernst Haeckel’s Radiolaria (1862)

Thursday 19 September 2013 at 17:55

According to Wikipedia Radiolaria are “protozoa of (diameter 0.1–0.2 mm) that produce intricate mineral skeletons, typically with a central capsule dividing the cell into the inner and outer portions of endoplasm and ectoplasm. They are found as zooplankton throughout the ocean, and their skeletal remains make up a large part of the cover of the ocean floor as siliceous ooze.” In 1862 the German biologist, philosopher and artist Ernst Haeckel published an image laden monograph on these microscopic organisms, turning his eye and exquisite line to their intricate and varied forms. For more on Haeckel check out our article “Ernst Haeckel and the Unity of Culture” by Dr Mario A. Di Gregorio, on Haeckel’s theory of “monism” which lies behind the mesmerising illustrations of his Kunstformen Der Natur. Housed at: Biodiversity Heritage Library | From: Harvard University Underlying Work: PD Worldwide | Digital Copy: No Additional Rights Download: Right click on image or see source for higher res versions HELP TO KEEP US AFLOAT The Public Domain Review is a not-for-profit project and we rely on support from our readers to stay afloat. If you like what we do then please do consider making a donation. We welcome all contributions, […]

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/09/19/ernst-haeckels-radiolaria-1862/


The Serious and the Smirk: The Smile in Portraiture

Wednesday 18 September 2013 at 15:01

Why do we so seldom see people smiling in painted portraits? Nicholas Jeeves explor…

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/09/18/the-serious-and-the-smirk-the-smile-in-portraiture/


Blackboard Sketching (1909)

Tuesday 17 September 2013 at 17:32

Blackboard Sketching, by Frederick Whitney; 1908; Milton Bradley, Springfield, Mass., New York. A book by Massachusetts based artist and teacher Frederik Whitney (1858-1949) on the lost art of blackboard drawing. As the introduction states: “Ability to draw easily and well on the blackboard is a power which every teacher of children covets. Such drawing is a language which never fails to hold attention and awaken delighted interest”. Housed at: Internet Archive | From: California Digital Library Underlying Work: PD U.S. & PD 50 years | Digital Copy: No Additional Rights Download: PDF | Torrent HELP TO KEEP US AFLOAT The Public Domain Review is a not-for-profit project and we rely on support from our readers to stay afloat. If you like what we do then please do consider making a donation. We welcome all contributions, big or small - everything helps! Become a Patron Small angel : £3.00 GBP - monthly Medium sized hero : £5.00 GBP - monthly Large emperor : £10.00 GBP - monthly Vast deity : £20.00 GBP - monthly Make a one off Donation SIGN UP TO THE NEWSLETTER Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest […]

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/09/17/blackboard-sketching-1909/