The Public Domain Review

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Ernst Haeckel’s Radiolaria (1862)

Thursday 19 September 2013 at 17:55

According to Wikipedia Radiolaria are “protozoa of (diameter 0.1–0.2 mm) that produce intricate mineral skeletons, typically with a central capsule dividing the cell into the inner and outer portions of endoplasm and ectoplasm. They are found as zooplankton throughout the ocean, and their skeletal remains make up a large part of the cover of the ocean floor as siliceous ooze.” In 1862 the German biologist, philosopher and artist Ernst Haeckel published an image laden monograph on these microscopic organisms, turning his eye and exquisite line to their intricate and varied forms. For more on Haeckel check out our article “Ernst Haeckel and the Unity of Culture” by Dr Mario A. Di Gregorio, on Haeckel’s theory of “monism” which lies behind the mesmerising illustrations of his Kunstformen Der Natur. Housed at: Biodiversity Heritage Library | From: Harvard University Underlying Work: PD Worldwide | Digital Copy: No Additional Rights Download: Right click on image or see source for higher res versions HELP TO KEEP US AFLOAT The Public Domain Review is a not-for-profit project and we rely on support from our readers to stay afloat. If you like what we do then please do consider making a donation. We welcome all contributions, […]

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/09/19/ernst-haeckels-radiolaria-1862/


The Serious and the Smirk: The Smile in Portraiture

Wednesday 18 September 2013 at 15:01

Why do we so seldom see people smiling in painted portraits? Nicholas Jeeves explor…

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/09/18/the-serious-and-the-smirk-the-smile-in-portraiture/


Blackboard Sketching (1909)

Tuesday 17 September 2013 at 17:32

Blackboard Sketching, by Frederick Whitney; 1908; Milton Bradley, Springfield, Mass., New York. A book by Massachusetts based artist and teacher Frederik Whitney (1858-1949) on the lost art of blackboard drawing. As the introduction states: “Ability to draw easily and well on the blackboard is a power which every teacher of children covets. Such drawing is a language which never fails to hold attention and awaken delighted interest”. Housed at: Internet Archive | From: California Digital Library Underlying Work: PD U.S. & PD 50 years | Digital Copy: No Additional Rights Download: PDF | Torrent HELP TO KEEP US AFLOAT The Public Domain Review is a not-for-profit project and we rely on support from our readers to stay afloat. If you like what we do then please do consider making a donation. We welcome all contributions, big or small - everything helps! Become a Patron Small angel : £3.00 GBP - monthly Medium sized hero : £5.00 GBP - monthly Large emperor : £10.00 GBP - monthly Vast deity : £20.00 GBP - monthly Make a one off Donation SIGN UP TO THE NEWSLETTER Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest […]

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/09/17/blackboard-sketching-1909/


Caption Competition #1

Wednesday 11 September 2013 at 19:24

“Oh, yes. The entrée is definitely locally sourced.” AND THE WINNER IS… FIRST PLACE “Oh, yes. The entrée is definitely locally sourced.” (submitted by Amy Vail, from Rochester, U.S.A) SECOND PLACE “I didn't waste your time! The classified ad clearly stated No Pets Allowed.” (submitted by Vivian Guy, from Tulsa, U.S.A) THIRD PLACE “Quick! TV inspector’s coming…” (submitted by Andres, London, UK) Many congratulations to Amy Vail from Rochester New York for providing the winning caption and being the well deserved recipient of a Public Domain Review tote bag! For those wondering, the image is from Volume 1 of a 15th century Belgian manuscript entitled Anciennes et nouvelles chroniques d’Angleterre (c.1470-1480) by Jean Wavrin, housed and digitised by the British Library (Royal 15 E IV). The picture is a detail from folio 52 showing Morbidus and the sea monster. Many thanks to the wonderful blog Demonagerie through which we stumbled across the image. Didn’t win this time? Worry not, try your hand again, in our Caption Competition #2! Learn more about The Public Domain Review Caption Competition by visiting the main competition page HERE. HELP TO KEEP US AFLOAT The Public Domain Review is a not-for-profit project and we rely […]

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/09/11/caption-competition-1/


A little wander down the catwalk of time…

Tuesday 10 September 2013 at 17:32

(seem more on our Pinterest Board). HELP TO KEEP US AFLOAT The Public Domain Review is a not-for-profit project and we rely on support from our readers to stay afloat. If you like what we do then please do consider making a donation. We welcome all contributions, big or small - everything helps! Become a Patron Small angel : £3.00 GBP - monthly Medium sized hero : £5.00 GBP - monthly Large emperor : £10.00 GBP - monthly Vast deity : £20.00 GBP - monthly Make a one off Donation SIGN UP TO THE NEWSLETTER Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest brand new article and a digest of the most recent collection items. Simply add your details to the form below and click the link you receive via email to confirm your subscription! Name: E-mail:

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/09/10/a-little-wander-down-the-catwalk-of-time/


The Coronation of King Ladislaus of Poland (1633)

Thursday 5 September 2013 at 17:10

Illustration from a book celebrating the coronation of King Ladislaus of Poland in February of 1633. A rather rotund looking Ladislaus (presuming the figure is, in fact, the king) hovers in the clouds with the Latin words Ingenium Naturae on a banner above his head, literally translating as “natural talent”. National Library of Poland Underlying Work: PD Worldwide | Digital Copy: No Additional Rights Download: Right click on image or see source for higher res versions HELP TO KEEP US AFLOAT The Public Domain Review is a not-for-profit project and we rely on support from our readers to stay afloat. If you like what we do then please do consider making a donation. We welcome all contributions, big or small - everything helps! Become a Patron Small angel : £3.00 GBP - monthly Medium sized hero : £5.00 GBP - monthly Large emperor : £10.00 GBP - monthly Vast deity : £20.00 GBP - monthly Make a one off Donation SIGN UP TO THE NEWSLETTER Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest brand new article and a digest of the most recent collection items. Simply add your details to the […]

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/09/05/the-coronation-of-king-ladislaus-of-poland-1633/


Proving it: The American Provers’ Union documents certain ill effects

Wednesday 4 September 2013 at 16:14

What would induce physicians to ingest mercury to the point of vomiting and to pains…

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/09/04/proving-it-the-american-provers-union-documents-certain-ill-effects/


Visual nation making and forgetting

Tuesday 3 September 2013 at 15:40

CURATOR’S CHOICE #3: HENRIK HOLM FROM THE NATIONAL GALLERY OF DENMARK Henrik Holm, curator at the National Gallery of Denmark, looks at the making of the Danish painting canon and its relation to the construction of a national identity. The selection of Danish artworks that the Statens Museum for Kunst, the National Gallery of Denmark, has released for free download in high resolution (under a CCBY-license) offers a good case for taking a critical look at how national identity is constructed. One of the images in this collection is the painting often claimed by Danish art historians to represent the birth of a truly Danish kind of art – A View through Three of the Northwestern Arches of the Third Storey of the Colosseum in Rome. It was created by Christopher Wilhelm Eckersberg, the artist known as “The Father of Danish Painting”, inspiring as he did the so-called Golden Age of Danish painting. At the heart of Eckersberg’s work, and this Golden Age he inspired, was the practise of making sketches out in the open, en plein air, a practice made popular by the Parisian school of painter and revolutionary Jacques-Louis David, of which Eckersberg was a pupil, and later […]

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/09/03/visual-nation-making-and-forgetting/


Edison’s backwards bicycle rider (1899)

Monday 2 September 2013 at 17:10

An animated GIF created by Okkult Motion Pictures excerpted from Bicycle Trick Riding (1899), a 38” film dated March 20th, 1899 by Thomas A. Edison, showing perhaps the first ever footage of a bicycle trick. See the film here. See more creations from Okkult Motion Pictures here in our Animated GIFs Collection. Okkult Motion Pictures is the brainchild of Marco Calabrese and Alessandro Scali from Turin, Italy. With the Excerpts project, Okkult Motion Pictures aims to bring to light the most interesting and unusual out-of-copyright moving images occulted in Internet archives, through a series of animated gifs. A digital archivalism project for the diffusion of open knowledge. Okkult Motion Pictures official website: / Facebook / Twitter All Okkult animated GIFs published here under a CC-BY-SA license. HELP TO KEEP US AFLOAT The Public Domain Review is a not-for-profit project and we rely on support from our readers to stay afloat. If you like what we do then please do consider making a donation. We welcome all contributions, big or small - everything helps! Become a Patron Small angel : £3.00 GBP - monthly Medium sized hero : £5.00 GBP - monthly Large emperor : £10.00 GBP - monthly Vast deity […]

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/09/02/edisons-backwards-bicycle-rider-1899/


That to Study Philosophy is to Learn to Die (1580)

Thursday 29 August 2013 at 17:42

…let us learn bravely to stand our ground, and fight him. And to begin to deprive him of the greatest advantage he has over us, let us take a way quite contrary to the common course. Let us disarm him of his novelty and strangeness, let us converse and be familiar with him, and have nothing so frequent in our thoughts as death. Upon all occasions represent him to our imagination in his every shape; at the stumbling of a horse, at the falling of a tile, at the least prick with a pin, let us presently consider, and say to ourselves, ‘Well, and what if it had been death itself?’ and, thereupon, let us encourage and fortify ourselves. Let us evermore, amidst our jollity and feasting, set the remembrance of our frail condition before our eyes, never suffering ourselves to be so far transported with our delights, but that we have some intervals of reflecting upon, and considering how many several ways this jollity of ours tends to death, and with how many dangers it threatens it. The Egyptians were wont to do after this manner, who in the height of their feasting and mirth, caused a dried skeleton […]

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/08/29/that-to-study-philosophy-is-to-learn-to-die-1580/