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The Redemption of Saint Anthony

Thursday 7 March 2013 at 13:41

Gustave Flaubert, best known for his masterpiece Madame Bovary, spent nearly thir…

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/03/07/the-redemption-of-saint-anthony/


Double Exposures

Tuesday 26 February 2013 at 16:54

A compilation of double exposures, an accidental phenomenon no longer possible with digital cameras. As well as the unintentional displayed here (though the first picture is debatable, and the saxophonist too), it was a common practise to use double exposures to create what became known as “Spirit Photographs”. One of the most prolific of the spirit photographers was a man named William Hope, whose startling images you can see in our post “The Spirit Photographs of William Hope”. (Images taken from a variety of sources, including Library of Congress and Flickr Commons. See link below each picture for more info). DONATE NOW TO SAVE THE PUBLIC DOMAIN REVIEW! With our initial funding now come to an end, we need your support to help us continue our mission – to promote the public domain as an indispensable public good, and to curate and showcase the most interesting out-of-copyright works on the web. SIGN UP TO THE NEWSLETTER Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest brand new article and a digest of the most recent collection items. Simply add your details to the form below and click the link you receive via [...]

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/02/26/double-exposures/


Various Forms of Architecture (1636)

Friday 22 February 2013 at 16:52

A selection of illustrations from Variae Architecturae Formae, a series of architectural studies after the works of Joanne Vredemanni Vriesio, also known in Dutch as Hans Vredeman de Vries (1527–c.1607). De Vries was a Dutch Renaissance architect, painter, and engineer. Studying Vitruvius and Sebastiano Serlio, (translated by his teacher Pieter Coecke van Aelst), he became an internationally known specialist in perspective and, as well as books on architecture, perspective and garden design, he became the city architect and fortification engineer for the city of Antwerp. The etchers of the images in the book are given as Jan and Lucas Van Doetecum, two brothers from Hollstein.(Wikipedia) (All images taken from Variae Architecturae Formae (1636) housed at the Internet Archive, contributed by The Getty. Hat-tip to John Ptak and his wonderful Pinterest boards where we first learnt of the book). DONATE NOW TO SAVE THE PUBLIC DOMAIN REVIEW! With our initial funding now come to an end, we need your support to help us continue our mission – to promote the public domain as an indispensable public good, and to curate and showcase the most interesting out-of-copyright works on the web. SIGN UP TO THE NEWSLETTER Sign up to get our free [...]

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/02/22/various-forms-of-architecture-1636/


Still Booking on De Quincey’s Mail-Coach

Wednesday 20 February 2013 at 18:24

Robin Jarvis looks at Thomas de Quincey’s essay “The English Mail-Co…

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/02/20/still-booking-on-de-quinceys-mail-coach/


Endless Amusement (1820)

Tuesday 19 February 2013 at 17:16

Endless Amusement, a collection of nearly 400 entertaining experiments in various branches of science, including acoustics, arithmetic, chemistry, electricity, hydraulics, hydrostatics, magnetism, mechanics, optics, wonders of the air pump, all the popular tricks and changes of the cards, &c., &c., &c.; 1820; Thorp and Burch, and Thomas Boys, London. As it states on the title page, a collection of “nearly 400 entertaining experiments in various branches of science, including acoustics, arithmetic, chemistry, electricity, hydraulics, hydrostatics, magnetism, mechanics, optics, wonders of the air pump, all the popular tricks and changes of the cards, &c., &c., &c. : to which is added, A complete system of pyrotechny, or, The art of making fireworks: the whole so clearly explained, as to be within the reach of the most limited capacity”. The book is housed at the Internet Archive, contributed by the California Digital Library. DONATE NOW TO SAVE THE PUBLIC DOMAIN REVIEW! With our initial funding now come to an end, we need your support to help us continue our mission – to promote the public domain as an indispensable public good, and to curate and showcase the most interesting out-of-copyright works on the web. SIGN UP TO THE NEWSLETTER Sign up to [...]

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/02/19/endless-amusement-1820/


Slovak Folk Songs (1928/30)

Monday 18 February 2013 at 17:35

Adele Keshelak sings three pairs of traditional Rusyn folk songs from Slovakia, recorded in New York on January 30th 1930: Track 1 – “Rusadelina Fialocka” (“Forget me Not”) and “D’Irava Mi Stricha Na Stajni” (“My Pet Horse Was Stolen”); Track 2 – “Na Dolini, V Hustom L’ Is’ I Na Dubi” (“In The Valley, In The Forest”) and “D’Ivki, D’Ivki Hej D’Ivki Na Selo” (“Girls, Girls, to Maidenlane”); Track 3 – “Uz Singl’ujut Zakryvajut Kasarnu” (“They’re Fitting Out The Barracks”) and “Na Oktobra, Na Persoho” (“Joining The Army”). The accordion soloist is Pawel Ondricka. Michael Tokarick provides one of the introductory speaking voices on Track 3; below are two folk songs form his miner’s band. These two Slovak folk dances were recorded in Camden, New Jersey on May 11th 1928. “Minersville Polka” is named after Tokarick’s hometown in the coal mining region of Pennsylvania. “Zelenim Hajecku” (“In The Green Fields”) is a traditional folk tune. MP3 Download: Adele Keshelak / Michael Tokarick Internet Archive link: Adele Keshelak / Michael Tokarick DONATE NOW TO SAVE THE PUBLIC DOMAIN REVIEW! With our initial funding now come to an end, we need your support to help us continue our mission – to promote [...]

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/02/18/slovak-folk-songs-192830/


The Heart in Art

Thursday 14 February 2013 at 16:13

A small selection of hearts through the history of art. (Images from a variety of places, see link below each image to see the source). and to finish off, a map of love, a land called Tendre: DONATE NOW TO SAVE THE PUBLIC DOMAIN REVIEW! With our initial funding now come to an end, we need your support to help us continue our mission – to promote the public domain as an indispensable public good, and to curate and showcase the most interesting out-of-copyright works on the web. SIGN UP TO THE NEWSLETTER Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest brand new article and a digest of the most recent collection items. Simply add your details to the form below and click the link you receive via email to confirm your subscription! Name: E-mail:

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/02/14/the-heart-in-art/


Emblems Ancient and Modern (1699)

Wednesday 13 February 2013 at 14:57

Devises et Emblemes Anciennes & Modernes, Tirees de Plus Celebres Auteurs; 1699; Kroniger & Göbel, Augspurg. Beautiful 17th century book showing various emblems with mottos described in German, Latin, French and Italian, and the emblems themselves described only in German. Some highlights include a floating stone, a lion being suspended over an empty throne, another lion gazing into a mirror and a flying ball. Here are a few choice examples, cut out and “cleaned”. The book is housed at the Internet Archive, contributed by the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. DONATE NOW TO SAVE THE PUBLIC DOMAIN REVIEW! With our initial funding now come to an end, we need your support to help us continue our mission – to promote the public domain as an indispensable public good, and to curate and showcase the most interesting out-of-copyright works on the web. SIGN UP TO THE NEWSLETTER Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest brand new article and a digest of the most recent collection items. Simply add your details to the form below and click the link you receive via email to confirm your subscription! Name: E-mail:

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/02/13/emblems-ancient-and-modern-1699/


Jehan Cousin’s Livre de Pourtraiture (1608)

Monday 11 February 2013 at 18:05

Selected images from a 1608 edition of Livre de Pourtraiture by Jehan Cousin the Younger (ca. 1522–1595), son of of the famous painter and sculptor Jehan Cousin the Elder (ca. 1490-ca. 1560) who was often compared to his contemporary, Albrecht Dürer. Just before his death, Jehan the Elder published his noted work Livre de Perspective in 1560 in which he noted that his son would soon be publishing a companion entitled, Livre de Pourtraiture. While there have been some reports that an edition of Livre de Pourtraiture was fist printed in 1571 and again in 1589, no copies appear to exist. Instead, the most likely first printing of the work was 1595 in Paris by David Leclerc, with woodcuts engraved by Jean Leclerc, just after Jehan Cousin the Younger’s death. The book is one of the most famous on the subject of artistic anatomy and was printed again and again into the late 17th century. (All images from the U.S. National Library of Medicine). DONATE NOW TO SAVE THE PUBLIC DOMAIN REVIEW! With our initial funding now come to an end, we need your support to help us continue our mission – to promote the public domain as an indispensable [...]

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/02/11/jehan-cousins-livre-de-pourtraiture-1608/


Horse Drawn Fire Engines (1896)

Friday 8 February 2013 at 15:18

Four horse drawn fire engines roar up a snow-covered Newark, New Jersey, street while spectators watch from the sidelines. Until the mid-19th century most fire engines were maneuvered by men, but the introduction of horse-drawn fire engines considerably improved the response time to incidents. The first self-propelled steam engine was built in New York in 1841. It was the target of sabotage by firefighters and its use was discontinued, and motorized fire engines did not become commonplace until the early 20th century. (Wikipedia) Download from Internet Archive Note this film is in the public domain in the US, but may not be in other jurisdictions. Please check its status in your jurisdiction before re-using. DONATE NOW TO SAVE THE PUBLIC DOMAIN REVIEW! With our initial funding now come to an end, we need your support to help us continue our mission – to promote the public domain as an indispensable public good, and to curate and showcase the most interesting out-of-copyright works on the web. SIGN UP TO THE NEWSLETTER Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest brand new article and a digest of the most recent collection items. Simply [...]

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/02/08/horse-drawn-fire-engines-1896/