The Public Domain Review

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Hand coloured photographs of 19th century Japan

Tuesday 17 December 2013 at 17:06

A selection from a series of 42 hand coloured albumine prints – a process which used the albumen found in egg whites to bind the photographic chemicals to the paper – taken around 1880. The presence of the pictures in the Dutch National Archieff reflects a long relationship between Japan and the Netherlands, the result of an exclusive commercial relationship that would last for more than two centuries (1641-1855). Housed at: Flickr: The Commons | From: Nationaal Archieff Underlying Work: PD Worldwide | Digital Copy: No Additional Rights Download: Right click on image or see source for higher res versions The following pictures from the collections of the Library of Congress are by the Italian–British photographer Felice Beato (probably also the creator of the images above), one of the first people to take photographs in East Asia and one of the first war photographers. Library of Congress Underlying Work: PD Worldwide | Digital Copy: No Additional Rights Download: Right click on image or see source for higher res versions HELP TO KEEP US AFLOAT The Public Domain Review is a not-for-profit project and we rely on support from our readers to stay afloat. If you like what we do then […]

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/12/17/19th-century-hand-coloured-photos-of-japan/


Edward Lear’s Walk on a Windy Day (1860)

Thursday 12 December 2013 at 15:23

An Edward Lear story concerning a man, referred to simply as E.L., taking the grave risk of going out for a walk on a windy day and living the consequences. These ten rare sketches are in a bound edition living in the Frederick R. Koch Collection at the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library in Yale University. Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library Underlying Work: PD Worldwide | Digital Copy: No Additional Rights Download: Right click on image or see source for higher res versions HELP TO KEEP US AFLOAT The Public Domain Review is a not-for-profit project and we rely on support from our readers to stay afloat. If you like what we do then please do consider making a donation. We welcome all contributions, big or small - everything helps! Become a Patron Small angel : £3.00 GBP - monthly Medium sized hero : £5.00 GBP - monthly Large emperor : £10.00 GBP - monthly Vast deity : £20.00 GBP - monthly Make a one off Donation SIGN UP TO THE NEWSLETTER Sign up to get our free fortnightly newsletter which shall deliver direct to your inbox the latest brand new article and a digest of the most […]

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/12/12/edward-lears-walk-on-a-windy-day-1860/


Encounter at the crossroads of Europe – the fellowship of Zweig and Verhaeren

Wednesday 11 December 2013 at 15:36

Stefan Zweig, whose works passed into the public domain this year in many countries around the world, was one of the most famous writers of the 1920s and 30s. Will Stone explores the importance of the Austrian's early friendship with the oft overlooked Belgian poet Emile Verhaeren.

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/12/11/encounter-at-the-crossroads-of-europe-the-fellowship-of-zweig-and-verhaeren/


Class of 2014

Tuesday 10 December 2013 at 13:17

Our top pick of people whose works will, on 1st January 2014, be entering the public domain in those countries with a 'life plus 70 years' copyright term, including Beatrix Potter, Nikola Tesla and Fats Waller.

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/12/10/class-of-2014/


Account of a Very Remarkable Young Musician (1769)

Thursday 5 December 2013 at 17:39

Account of a Very Remarkable Young Musician. In a Letter from the Honourable Daines Barrington, F. R. S. to Mathew Maty, M. D. Sec. R. S.; 1770; Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, London Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, one of history’s most famous composers, began showing his talents when he was just 3 years old. By the age of 6 he was touring with his father and elder sister, also a talented musician. It was the young Mozart however who wowed the audiences. After a concert at the court of the Prince-elector Maximilian III of Bavaria in Munich, and at the Imperial Court in Vienna and Prague, the Mozart family embarked on a 3 and half year concert tour around the courts of Munich, Mannheim, Paris, London, The Hague, again to Paris, and back home via Zurich, Donaueschingen, and Munich. While in London, an 8 year old Mozart proved a huge sensation. But with his child prodigy status came questions from a skeptical few. Was he really so young? Was he really that talented? One person eager to test the truth of these doubts was Daines Barrington, a lawyer, antiquary, naturalist and Friend of the Royal Society. In a few visits […]

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/12/05/account-of-a-very-remarkable-young-musician-1769/


Specimens of Chromatic Wood Type and Borders (1874)

Wednesday 4 December 2013 at 17:41

Some select pages from the exquisite Specimens of Chromatic Wood Type, Borders, Etc. (1874), a specimen book produced by the William H. Page wood type company. Chromatic types, which were made to print in two or more colours, were first produced as wood type by Edwin Allen, and shown by George Nesbitt in his 1841 Fourth Specimen of Machinery Cut Wood Type. It is William H Page’s book, however, that is considered to be the highpoint of chromatic wood type production. As well as providing over 100 pages of brilliantly coloured type, the book can also be seen, at times, to act as some sort of accidental experimental poetry volume, with such strange snippets as “Geographical excursion knives home” and “Numerous stolen mind” adorning its pages. One wonders whether the decisions about what words to feature and in what order were entirely arbitrary. Thanks to the wonderful Bibliodyssey blog where we came across the book: visit the post there for more info on the book and a great list of related links. Housed at: Internet Archive | From: Columbia University Libraries Found via: Bibliodyssey Underlying Work: PD Worldwide | Digital Copy: No Additional Rights Download: Right click on image or […]

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/12/04/specimens-of-chromatic-wood-type-and-borders-1874/


Music manuscripts from the 17th and 18th centuries in the British Library

Tuesday 3 December 2013 at 12:49

CURATOR’S CHOICE #6: SANDRA TUPPEN FROM THE BRITISH LIBRARY Sandra Tuppen, curator of Music Manuscripts at the British Library, explores some highlights from their digitised collection of music manuscripts, including those penned by the hand of Haydn, Handel, Purcell, and a very messy Beethoven. Ever since the earliest methods of notating music were devised, composers and scribes have written out music by hand – on vellum in the medieval period and subsequently on paper. (Only now is this beginning to change, with the advent of computer programs for music notation.) Even after the perfecting of music printing techniques in the 16th century, when music was printed using moveable type and later by engraving, and the burgeoning of a trade in music publishing, much music continued to be written out by hand and circulated in manuscript. Printing music was expensive, time-consuming and complex; copying out music by hand could be done relatively cheaply and quickly, especially when a few copies only of a particular composition were needed. In the 17th and 18th centuries, music was written out in manuscript for several purposes. These included the creation of ‘master copies’ from which further handwritten copies could be made when required, the provision […]

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/12/03/music-manuscripts-from-the-17th-and-18th-centuries-in-the-british-library/


The Chinese Fairy Book (1921)

Thursday 28 November 2013 at 17:29

A book compiling seventy-four traditional Chinese folk takes, making, as the translator notes, "probably the most comprehensive and varied collection of oriental fairy tales ever made available for American readers".

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/11/28/the-chinese-fairy-book-1921/


Time and Place: Eric Ravilious (1903-1942)

Wednesday 27 November 2013 at 14:19

In many countries around the world the works of Eric Ravilious have come out of copyright this year – he died when his aircraft went missing off Iceland while he was making war paintings. An artist in multiple disciplines, his greater legacy dwells in water-colours. Frank Delaney re-visits the work of this understated, yet significant figure.

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/11/27/time-and-place-eric-ravilious-1903-1942/


Caption Competition #3

Thursday 21 November 2013 at 17:15

“Sir Joshua Kindell’s reading device offers paperwhite pages and stores up to 12 books. Carry case available.” AND THE WINNER IS… FIRST PLACE “Sir Joshua Kindell’s reading device offers paperwhite pages and stores up to 12 books. Carry case available.” (submitted by Andrew Chapman, Oxfordshire, UK) SECOND PLACE An early depiction of a device for torturing book-lovers, known as “The Complete Works of Dan Brown” (submitted by Conductor71) THIRD PLACE Now if we can get this a wee bit smaller, we might have a chance against these ebook-readers… (submitted by Michael Hinkel, Heidelberg, Germany) Many congratulations to Andrew Chapman from Oxfordshire, UK, for providing the winning caption and being the well deserved recipient of a Public Domain Review tote bag! Learn more about The Public Domain Review Caption Competition by visiting the main competition page HERE. HELP TO KEEP US AFLOAT The Public Domain Review is a not-for-profit project and we rely on support from our readers to stay afloat. If you like what we do then please do consider making a donation. We welcome all contributions, big or small - everything helps! Become a Patron Small angel : £3.00 GBP - monthly Medium sized hero : £5.00 GBP - […]

Source: http://publicdomainreview.org/2013/11/21/caption-competition-3/